MeteoHelix weather station to revolutionize tropical climate monitoring

MeteoHelix is the first IoT weather station on LoRaWAN in Samoa, South Pacific.

MeteoHelix is the first IoT weather station on LoRaWAN in Samoa, South Pacific.

The MeteoHelix weather station is the first IoT device to demonstrate a LoRaWAN Internet of Things wireless network on the island nation of Samoa in the South Pacific during the Pacific Meteorological Council (PMC-5) meeting. Its secure encrypted meteorological data connection uses The Things Network LoRa server to rout data to the allMETEO.com meteorological cloud platform as part of an early warning weather monitoring system demonstration. The ease of deployment of the MeteoHelix weather stations makes them unique in the marketplace.

BARANI DESIGN Technologies team sharing a stand with  COMPTUS  of USA, a BARANI DESIGN distributor.

BARANI DESIGN Technologies team sharing a stand with COMPTUS of USA, a BARANI DESIGN distributor.

Designed to survive cyclone, hurricane and typhoon force winds and direct impacts of flying debris, the MeteoHelix weather station is the only weather station on the market today that can reliably function through the destruction they bring.

We would like to thank the the Government of Samoa, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MNRE) as the hosts of the PMC-5 meeting and Varysian, the organizers of the hydrometeorological equipment exhibition, for making this demonstration possible.


The Fifth meeting of the Pacific Meteorological Council (PMC-5) will showcase the innovative MeteoHelix micro-weather stations

MeteoHelix weather station monitoring a beach.

MeteoHelix weather station monitoring a beach.

With the fifth meeting of the Pacific Meteorological Council (PMC-5) in Apia, Samoa quickly approaching, BARANI DESIGN Technologies team has set off to showcase the latest meteorological technology to the PMC's NHMS members and senior government officials from SPREP member countries. Additionally, their development partners, Council of the Regional Organisations in the Pacific (CROP), United Nations' agencies, collaborating organisations and institutions with also be present to discuss mitigation strategies of accelerated global warming and the adoption of early warning weather monitoring systems.

BARANI DESIGN Technologies will showcase the MeteoHelix weather stations which are capable of surviving impacts of flying debris as found in cyclones. Being the only professional weather station to be able to survive such conditions while meeting WMO requirements for precision and accuracy of measurement, makes the MeteoHelix IoT Pro a one of a kind proposition for island nations most affected by climate change.

The hydrometeorological equipment exhibition will be held on 5 - 9 August 2019 alongside the PMC-5 and is organized by Varysian.

HMP155 & Sensor Response Time effect on Measurement Error

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Its worth noting that the temperature time constant listed for the HMP155 is at a hefty 3 m/s airflow speed as shown in the photo from its manual. Thus the HMP155 temperature time constant converted to still air will, unfortunately, be significantly higher and hence the HMP155 temperature measurement error due to fluctuating air temperature will NOT be per WMO recommended guidelines as specified in the WMO – The CIMO Guide – Guide to Meteorological Instruments and Methods of Observation, 2014 Edition updated in 2017.

Due to the slow time response of this temperature sensor, an air temperature fluctuation of 2 °C over a period of 2 minutes in 3 m/s airflow will show a measurement error of 0.29 °C (at 3 m/s air speed) on top of the basic sensor accuracy/uncertainty.

Flow obstruction caused by a radiation shield will significantly increase this error for low wind speeds. Despite the status quo, it will be very hard to justify the HMP155’s use for precision climatic measurement. In 1 m/s air, the time constant can rise to 35 seconds and in 0.5 m/s air to 49 seconds, thus producing errors over 0.5 °C due to only the sensor’s slow response time.